Canine Dog – TW Labradors http://twlabradors.com/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:01:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://twlabradors.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/tw-labradors-icon-150x150.jpg Canine Dog – TW Labradors http://twlabradors.com/ 32 32 Therapy Dogs Help Chicago Police Relieve Overwhelming Workplace Stress http://twlabradors.com/therapy-dogs-help-chicago-police-relieve-overwhelming-workplace-stress/ http://twlabradors.com/therapy-dogs-help-chicago-police-relieve-overwhelming-workplace-stress/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:25:55 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/therapy-dogs-help-chicago-police-relieve-overwhelming-workplace-stress/ A dog walks into the room. His name is Teddy. He pauses before addressing the call from Chicago police officers assigned to the city’s most dangerous areas. What happens then is remarkable: the silent pursuit of cops in crisis Chicago last year by an elite volunteer corps of therapy dogs trained to calm victims of […]]]>

A dog walks into the room.

His name is Teddy.

He pauses before addressing the call from Chicago police officers assigned to the city’s most dangerous areas.

What happens then is remarkable: the silent pursuit of cops in crisis Chicago last year by an elite volunteer corps of therapy dogs trained to calm victims of disasters, confrontations, chaos and catastrophes.

But Teddy, the observant goldendoodle, is no police dog.

The silky mane dog is a rescuer who does not bark or bite. He’s tasked with reducing the stress levels, blood pressure and trauma of police officers assigned to CPD’s community safety patrol in the city’s most violent areas.

Their office is on the ground floor for police calls, sitting next to or lying next to men and women in bulletproof vests and heavy equipment.

Shot down from units across the city since the 2020 protests and riots that followed the murder of black American George Floyd, the Community Safety Patrol is also assigned areas dealing with the massive rise in shootings, gang crimes streets and too many children injured or killed on the South and West Sides of Chicago.

Last July, Chicago Police Officer Ella French, 29, a member of the Community Safety Patrol, was one of the people who patted Teddy’s head as he sat on the floor next to him. during his police call at McCormick Place.

Left to right: Constables Klaudia Zylinska, Renata Klepacki and Carly Cervantez interact with therapy dog ​​Ariel on Wednesday after a call to the 18th district police station,
Pat Nabong / Sun-Times

It was there that Officer French and hundreds of colleagues greeted one of their own who had died alone, an unexpected death after his 12-hour non-leave shift ended.

Several weeks later, Officer French was also deceased.

On August 7, she was shot in the head at close range by a gunman while performing a routine traffic check in Englewood.

The next day, Teddy would return to McCormick’s house to help Constable French’s fellow police officers mourn his death – as well as the catastrophic shooting of his partner, Carlos Yanez.

“I did not know the French officer, but I recognized his photo and remembered his smile and his joy as he stroked Teddy lying next to him in this audience of grief mourning the untimely death of the officer of police, ”said the retired police sergeant. Cindy Gross, Teddy’s mistress. Gross is a 30-year veteran of the police service who retired in 2001 after years of working undercover in drugs, vice and prostitution.

Gross has since dedicated his time and pets to therapy dog ​​work with the Rainbow Animal Assisted Therapy Group in Morton Grove – and is now responsible for 20 teams of Rainbow volunteers working with the Chicago Police Department. The organization is fully funded by donations; it has no salaried employees.

“These policemen go to war every day,” Gross said.

“They’ve seen it all, are exhausted from 12 hour shifts, no days off, no vacations, little family time to relax – which is very difficult to do if families need child care. – and the feeling that they are not supported by politicians or the public, ”she said. “They were beaten.

“Police officers find it hard to talk about what they’re going through, but you’d be amazed how they bend over a dog’s fur and talk to them. It is breathtaking.

“I don’t let Teddy determine his direction, but these dogs somehow find who needs it most,” said Gross, who continues to take Teddy to hospitals, autism centers and first responders in need of help. ‘aid. “Our organization Rainbow is also a disaster partner with the American Red Cross.

Officer Carly Cervantez greets therapy dog ​​Teddy on Wednesday as Cindy Gross watches before a roll call at the 18th District Police Station.
Pat Nabong / Sun-Times

Robert Sobol, director of CPD’s peer support counseling program, who, along with peer manager Bea Staszewski, gave the go-ahead for Rainbow canine therapy support last year.

“If there is a way to recover from stress each day by smiling, touching, becoming calm or being able to grieve by petting a therapy dog, stress reduction can become a habit,” said Sobol.

“We have had dogs before that have helped after a traumatic incident, but nothing like this ability to tap into the amazing Rainbow organization.

“I used to bring my wonderful, sloppy big rescue dog, Mason, a lab and mastiff mix to the office, and he encouraged them to start talking,” he added.

Retired Chicago Police Detective Roland Paulnitsky works alongside Cindy Gross with her PTSD-trained Labrador Ariel as they travel to neighborhoods they consider too dangerous for other Rainbow volunteers.

“We are trained in police work and while working with the dogs last year on the 15th Austin Ward Police District roll call we encountered gunshots leaving the station,” Gross said. . “It was pop pop pop to our left. A shot dead person. One person down. Then two shots at the same time. So very close. It’s horrible. And Roland and I can carry arms.

“Therapy dogs absorb all of the negative stress and energy, so you have to be careful about how long you work them at a time. A little help in dog therapy can help a person concentrate a bit.

A dog watch. How heartwarming.

Needles …

Best wishes to the indomitable Carol Carroll, recovering from an operation at Evanston Hospital. Saturday birthdays: James Marsden, 48, Jada Pinkett Smith, 50, and Ben Carson, 70. Sunday birthdays. Jimmy Fallon, 47; Sanaa Lathan, 50, and Trisha Yearwood, 57.


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Canine flu spreads quickly in LA County – CBS Los Angeles http://twlabradors.com/canine-flu-spreads-quickly-in-la-county-cbs-los-angeles/ http://twlabradors.com/canine-flu-spreads-quickly-in-la-county-cbs-los-angeles/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 02:10:00 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/canine-flu-spreads-quickly-in-la-county-cbs-los-angeles/ LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – A warning to dog owners – canine flu, or canine flu, has spread rapidly in Los Angeles County. Whether in a dog park or a dog day care center, some dogs have a strong, debilitating cough. READ MORE: Housing crisis: Newsom signs measures to allow more duplexes and apartments near public […]]]>


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Led by the nose: Meet the UAE’s COVID-19 sniffer dogs http://twlabradors.com/led-by-the-nose-meet-the-uaes-covid-19-sniffer-dogs/ http://twlabradors.com/led-by-the-nose-meet-the-uaes-covid-19-sniffer-dogs/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 14:53:00 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/led-by-the-nose-meet-the-uaes-covid-19-sniffer-dogs/ DUBAI, September 16 (Reuters) – A year after completing one of the first studies into canine detection of COVID-19, the United Arab Emirates now has 38 sniffer dogs working at their airports who can identify people infected with a 98.2% success rate. Dubai Police have trained the cohort, which includes German Shepherds, Labradors, Cockers and […]]]>

DUBAI, September 16 (Reuters) – A year after completing one of the first studies into canine detection of COVID-19, the United Arab Emirates now has 38 sniffer dogs working at their airports who can identify people infected with a 98.2% success rate.

Dubai Police have trained the cohort, which includes German Shepherds, Labradors, Cockers and Border Collies, to recognize the scent of COVID-19 using sweat samples from confirmed infected people collected in holding a cotton swab in an armpit for a few minutes.

“A very small amount is then put in a jar – it has the smell of the patient – then we take the sample out for the dog to sniff it … When he gives us a sign, we give him a treat,” he said. said First Lieutenant Nasser al-Falasi of the Dubai Police, program supervisor at the K9 training center in the Awir region of Dubai.

In the centre’s large training room, police officers walk dogs along a row of metal cans, only one of which contains a positive sample. The dogs sniff the samples and within seconds sit down to signal that they have found something.

Police trainer Fatima al-Jasmi, who is part of the COVID-19 detection team, guides an excited-looking black-and-white Border Collie through the exercises, succeeding every time.

“The training was a bit of a challenge, learning a new skill on an international level and then training the dog in that,” she said.

The study in Dubai, published in June in Communications Biology, part of the British scientific journal Nature, found a detection success rate of 98.2%.

The study used sweat samples and PCR tests from 3,290 people to compare the dogs’ detection abilities.

Several other countries, including Finland, the United States and France, have organized their own dog training and canine testing for COVID-19.

Falasi said dogs are currently performing around 30 to 40 tests per day at airports. Bolt, a black and tan Belgian Malinois, was the first COVID-19 detector dog he trained.

“He often goes on missions. He may have done over 1,000 COVID-19 tests,” Falasi said proudly.

Dogs are primarily used at airports in the United Arab Emirates, but are ready for use wherever needed.

Dubai has received requests from around the world to share knowledge on how to train dogs to detect COVID-19, said Major Salah Khalifa al-Mazroui of the Dubai Police Force.

Dubai Police have also trained dogs to detect drugs and explosives, skills put to use as the Emirate of Dubai prepares to open the site of the Dubai Expo2020 World Expo next month.

Reporting by Abdelhadi Ramahi Writing by Lisa Barrington Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Miami International Airport tests sniffer dogs for Covid-19 – Robb Report http://twlabradors.com/miami-international-airport-tests-sniffer-dogs-for-covid-19-robb-report/ http://twlabradors.com/miami-international-airport-tests-sniffer-dogs-for-covid-19-robb-report/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 21:17:43 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/miami-international-airport-tests-sniffer-dogs-for-covid-19-robb-report/ Looks like authorities have found a new use for a familiar, furry security tactic. Miami International Airport recently revealed that it was hosting a pilot Covid-19 detector dog program in September. Approved in March 2021 by the Board of County Commissioners, the month-long program makes MIA the first U.S. airport to test sniffer dogs for […]]]>

Looks like authorities have found a new use for a familiar, furry security tactic.

Miami International Airport recently revealed that it was hosting a pilot Covid-19 detector dog program in September. Approved in March 2021 by the Board of County Commissioners, the month-long program makes MIA the first U.S. airport to test sniffer dogs for Covid. The Miami-Dade Department of Aviation hosts the program in partnership with the Global Forensic and Justice Center (GFJC), Florida International University (FIU) and American Airlines. Miami-Dade County Commissioner Kionne L. McGhee sponsored the program to help the airport’s ongoing efforts to stop the spread of the virus.

Two furry detectors – Cobra, a Belgian Malinois, and One Betta, a Dutch Shepard – were specially trained for the program based on protocols created by the GFJC and CRF, and are now expected to detect and respond immediately to the virus within public spaces. . Both dogs have undergone hundreds of CRF training sessions Modesto Maidique Campus in Miami this year, and double-blind, peer-reviewed tracks have shown positive results. Experts have noticed that dogs’ accuracy rates for detecting Covid-19 have increased from 96% to 99% during testing.

When it comes to how dogs exactly identify carriers of the virus, it all comes down to a smell. The virus causes metabolic changes in a person that result in the production of volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. These compounds are then excreted when a person breathes and sweats. Apparently, these metabolic changes are common to all people, regardless of their individual smells. Both MIA dogs were trained to detect this common, but specific, scent. If any of the K9s indicate that a traveler smells of the virus, airport officials will order the individual to receive a prompt Covid test.

One of two dogs in MIA’s Covid-19 canine unit.

Courtesy of Miami International Airport

Detector dogs have been used by federal and local agencies across the country for years to detect banned currency, drugs, explosives, and agriculture, all primarily based on odors. (Some studies claim that detector dogs can also identify people with other serious illnesses, such as diabetes, epilepsy, and various cancers.) Biochemistry, Dr Kenneth G. Furton, this is exactly why the program has been successful.

Being able to apply decades of research in this way, to provide an extra layer of protection for airport employees at Miami International Airport, is a lesson in humility, ”said Furton ina statement on the program. “These dogs are another valuable tool that we can use to help us live with this ongoing pandemic. In the same statement, Miami Dade-Country Mayor Daniella Levine Cava also shared her thoughts on the program and what could happen when it ends at the end of the month. “We are proud to do everything possible to protect our residents,” she said. “I look forward to seeing how the airport tests their skills and expanding the pilot program to other facilities in the county.”


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How Senna the dog was saved by Lottie’s canine blood transfusion http://twlabradors.com/how-senna-the-dog-was-saved-by-lotties-canine-blood-transfusion/ http://twlabradors.com/how-senna-the-dog-was-saved-by-lotties-canine-blood-transfusion/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 22:15:02 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/how-senna-the-dog-was-saved-by-lotties-canine-blood-transfusion/ Saved by a real hunting dog: how Senna the dog was within hours of death when Lottie came to the rescue with a transfusion Senna the dog was within hours of his death and vets tried one last treatment The vizsla suffered from a rare blood disease which was not eliminated by drugs Treatment took […]]]>

Saved by a real hunting dog: how Senna the dog was within hours of death when Lottie came to the rescue with a transfusion

  • Senna the dog was within hours of his death and vets tried one last treatment
  • The vizsla suffered from a rare blood disease which was not eliminated by drugs
  • Treatment took place at the Royal Veterinary College for Animals in Hertfordshire










His eyes might be bright and alert now, but Senna was only hours from death after being diagnosed with a rare blood disease.

The vets had tried everything from antibiotics to eye drops to stop his decline, except for one last treatment – a real hunting dog.

Thanks to a blood donation from Lottie, Senna received a transfusion that “restarted” his immune system – and saved his life.

Senna the vizsla, left, suffered from an incredibly rare blood disease and required a blood transfusion from Lottie the Airedale Terrier, right, as part of a pioneering treatment

The vets had tried everything from antibiotics to eye drops to stop Senna's decline, except for one final treatment they used with the animal just hours after death.

The vets had tried everything from antibiotics to eye drops to stop Senna’s decline, except for one final treatment they used with the animal just hours after death.

The Queen Mother Hospital for Animals at the Royal Veterinary College in Hertfordshire, where the transfusion took place, brought them together to raise awareness about vital canine blood banks

The Queen Mother Hospital for Animals at the Royal Veterinary College in Hertfordshire, where the transfusion took place, brought them together to raise awareness about vital canine blood banks

The Wire-haired Vizsla and Airedale Terrier first met this week, and after a good sniff, hit it off.

The Queen Mother Hospital for Animals at the Royal Veterinary College in Hertfordshire, where the transfusion took place, brought them together to raise awareness about vital canine blood banks.

During the pandemic, donations fell 40%, which could hamper vets who perform thousands of complex procedures each year.

Senna owner Debbie McKeown, 58, said: “Lottie’s blood breathed new life into Senna. It was wonderful to meet her. The travel consultant and her engineer husband Paul, 57, realized Senna was sick two years ago. She suffered from immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, which causes a dog’s immune system to destroy red blood cells, leading to organ failure.

“She had become totally lethargic. It was horrible to watch, ”said Ms McKeown, of Ware, Hertfordshire. Senna was estimated to be 12 hours from death when the emergency transfusion took place. Ms McKeown said: ‘We took her for the operation during the pandemic so we had to leave her at the door. It was traumatic. I didn’t know if we would see her again.

Lottie’s owner Angela Jarman is a blood donor herself and offered her pet when she heard about the need for canine blood. Airedales are one of the breeds with a DEA 1 negative blood group that can be given to all dogs.

Lottie has now donated blood six times and wears a red bandana to show that she is a registered donor. Ms Jarman, 50, a glass artist who lives with her climbing instructor husband Paul, 50, and their daughter Flora, 10, in Welwyn Garden City, said: “Lottie loves to donate blood. we’re going to make a big deal out of it.

“It only takes about 40 minutes and the dogs can’t smell a thing. She has a bandage around her neck where the blood was taken and a bowl of sausage for treats.

Donor dogs typically weigh over 20 kg and can donate every two months until they are eight years old.


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The dog pee caused the collapse of a traffic pole in Japan. Then things got weird http://twlabradors.com/the-dog-pee-caused-the-collapse-of-a-traffic-pole-in-japan-then-things-got-weird/ http://twlabradors.com/the-dog-pee-caused-the-collapse-of-a-traffic-pole-in-japan-then-things-got-weird/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 20:31:48 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/the-dog-pee-caused-the-collapse-of-a-traffic-pole-in-japan-then-things-got-weird/ Authorities were initially baffled when an iron traffic light collapsed in Mie Prefecture in Kansai, Honshu. The six-meter (19-foot) pole fell on bushes without injuring anyone, but now the likely culprit has been found It’s pee. Lots and lots of dog pee. This type of post is designed to last approximately 50 years. This one […]]]>

Authorities were initially baffled when an iron traffic light collapsed in Mie Prefecture in Kansai, Honshu. The six-meter (19-foot) pole fell on bushes without injuring anyone, but now the likely culprit has been found

It’s pee. Lots and lots of dog pee.

This type of post is designed to last approximately 50 years. This one broke barely 23 years after its installation. In Japan, a country known for its stellar engineering, this doesn’t happen very often, so authorities wanted to see what the cause was. The post structure looked fine, so why did it break?

A favorite place

It was the chemical analyzes that revealed a criminal act; canine foul play, that is. The urea concentration in the post’s underground foundation was 42 times higher than in other traffic lights nearby. Around the edge of the column, the concentration was also 8 times higher.

Since urea is a waste found in urine, authorities began to suspect that it was dog urine that was causing the problem. A brief investigation found that many people were walking their dogs in the area, and when a new traffic light was put up it also became a popular urine spot for dogs.

A photo of the corroded column

Mammalian urine can corrode the metal, as it appears to have been the case here. While this doesn’t happen overnight, the damage can build up year after year.

“Even if the amount of urine is low, repetition over a long period can damage public infrastructure and cause it to collapse,” said officer Takahashi Koji, who serves in the traffic management and control division of the prefectural police.

After that, things got even more bizarre.

Peeing at home

Koji called on dog owners to find other places for their pets to urinate, which seems pretty reasonable. A tree or a park or something, right? Well not really. “We want them to look for alternatives, like encouraging their pets to pee before going for a walk,” Koji said.

As NHK Reports, the dog owners in the area were very confused, but veterinarian Shibanai Akiko agrees and says it’s time for the dogs to start peeing at home.

“Dogs don’t stress even if they don’t excrete or pee during a walk, or if they don’t mark their territory,” she explains. “Plus, it won’t make them sick. “

“I recommend that owners discipline their dogs to excrete at home to check their health with their excretory substances. It is also to allow dogs to realize that they are members of our society, ”she says.

So, uh, is it time for dogs to start peeing at home, and not just walking around? What do you think?


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Hot dog: Edmonton Fire’s new K9 recruit sniffs flammable liquids for snacks http://twlabradors.com/hot-dog-edmonton-fires-new-k9-recruit-sniffs-flammable-liquids-for-snacks/ http://twlabradors.com/hot-dog-edmonton-fires-new-k9-recruit-sniffs-flammable-liquids-for-snacks/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 20:39:14 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/hot-dog-edmonton-fires-new-k9-recruit-sniffs-flammable-liquids-for-snacks/ Content of the article The new recruit to the local fire department has a flair for flammable liquids like gasoline and an affinity for hot dogs. Content of the article The Edmonton Fire Department (EFRS) presented their new K9, Marshal, to the training academy on 157th Street on Friday. He and his master were certified […]]]>

Content of the article

The new recruit to the local fire department has a flair for flammable liquids like gasoline and an affinity for hot dogs.

Content of the article

The Edmonton Fire Department (EFRS) presented their new K9, Marshal, to the training academy on 157th Street on Friday. He and his master were certified in July, and now Marshal is helping investigators find where and how the fires started, all for his favorite snacks.

Captain Ian Smith says Marshal is an important member of the team. He brings him to any scene where there’s a chance to find flammable liquids, and his sensitive nose means he can find them much faster than humans.

“We also have electronic instruments that we can use, but it’s been proven that dogs are more precise, there are more precise points, they know exactly where to go,” he says.

“We don’t have the nose they have – a dog’s nose is over 10,000 times stronger than a person’s. They can find things pretty quickly, but we would take hours.

Edmonton Fire Rescue Services (EFRS) Fire Investigator Captain Ian Smith and EFRS Flammable Liquid Detection Field Marshal K9 pose for a photo at the EFRS Training Academy, 10420 157 St., in Edmonton on Friday September 3, 2021. Photo by David Bloom Photo by David Bloom David Bloom /David Bloom / Postmedia

The 21-month-old Belgian Malinois is trained to find traces of 12 different substances, including kerosene, diesel and gasoline.

Marshal informs Smith by wagging his tail or nodding his head when he comes to an area where he thinks he can find something, Smith says. Once he does, he points his nose and holds in place, then gets a reward.

Content of the article

The dog’s full registered name is Alberta Fire Marshal K9. Alberta K9 co-owner Kelsey Boettcher, who raised and trained him, says it was just a happy coincidence – his litter had fire-themed names after their father, Arson.

This type of breed loves to work, she says.

“It’s his greatest joy in life,” says Boettcher. “We teach by association of scents – he looks for a toy or a food… associating us food and scent from the start. “

Boettcher teaches puppies to scent imprint by training them to stick their noses into a series of tubes and boxes, and when they smell the right scent they get a reward.

Working with a dog is a new challenge for Smith, but now he has a whole new appreciation for their talents. The two bonded and built a relationship of mutual trust, he says.

“I think I’m pretty much his best friend these days,” he says.

“I’ve had companion dogs before, but having a working dog is pretty special … I can take my dog ​​to work every day.”

EFRS K9s typically work five to seven years before retirement. Marshal is the fourth dog in the department since 1996. The last K9, Grover, retired last year with his handler.

lboothby@postmedia.com

@laurby

Edmonton Fire Rescue Services (EFRS) Flammable Liquid Detection K9 Marshal demonstrates his detection skills with Fire Investigation Captain Ian Smith at the EFRS Training Academy, 10420 157 St., in Edmonton on Friday September 3, 2021. Photo by David Bloom
Edmonton Fire Rescue Services (EFRS) Flammable Liquid Detection K9 Marshal demonstrates his detection skills with Fire Investigation Captain Ian Smith at the EFRS Training Academy, 10420 157 St., in Edmonton on Friday September 3, 2021. Photo by David Bloom Photo by David Bloom David Bloom /David Bloom / Postmedia



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Outraged fans try to cancel controversial new Netflix show http://twlabradors.com/outraged-fans-try-to-cancel-controversial-new-netflix-show/ http://twlabradors.com/outraged-fans-try-to-cancel-controversial-new-netflix-show/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:30:34 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/outraged-fans-try-to-cancel-controversial-new-netflix-show/ There are so many Netflix shows to watch these days, in what has become an incomprehensible vast ocean of content with pretty much something for everyone to enjoy. Likewise, the more content there is on Netflix? The more likely it is that people will complain and protest against this or that addition to the library. […]]]>

There are so many Netflix shows to watch these days, in what has become an incomprehensible vast ocean of content with pretty much something for everyone to enjoy. Likewise, the more content there is on Netflix? The more likely it is that people will complain and protest against this or that addition to the library. Concrete example : Canine intervention, a reality TV series that debuted on Netflix earlier this year.

He follows famous Oakland dog trainer Jas Leverette as he runs Cali K9. “One of the best dog training centers in California,” according to Netflix. “Using his unique training methods and techniques, each episode will feature Jas as he works with a variety of dogs and their owners to resolve their obedience and behavior issues. Jas works with all breeds he has never turned down a dog and can correct even the most extreme behavior problems.

Netflix shows to watch – Canine intervention

Netflix shows that generate divergent opinions among viewers are not new. Corn Canine intervention, still awaiting approval for the second season, is in a whole different category.

There are actually competing fan petitions about this show circulating online. Calling both Netflix to renew the show as well as to cancel the show.

“The show Canine intervention … Features an animal trainer who demonstrates the use of choke collars, claw collars and electric shock collars on multiple social media platforms, ” this Change.org petition, which has collected nearly 50,000 signatures, says. “We don’t need another Caesar-type trainer on TV showing inhuman training techniques to pet owners.”

On the other side of the equation, this rival Change.org petition collected just over 19,000 signatures in support of the show. Specifically, he calls on Netflix to give the green light to additional seasons of the series. It currently has six episodes of about half an hour on Netflix.

“Thanks to Netflix and Jas Leverette, millions of dog owners have renewed hope that their dogs can be trained,” the petition states. Jas Leverette and Canine intervention, he continues, are helping save dogs around the world from abandonment, abuse and even worse fate.

All dogs go to Netflix

There is, of course, other dog-themed content to enjoy on Netflix. Shows that have garnered near universal praise and have remained out of the way of controversy. If this is what you are looking for, we will draw your attention to the series Dogs. It is comforting, two season netflix series which follows a few different stories about the bond between people and their dogs, from countries like Syria, Japan, Italy, Costa Rica and the United States. An outstanding episode, and my favorite, is Episode 2 of Season 1. Entitled Well done Zeus.

Here is the description of the Netflix episode. “Eager to reunite, Syrian refugee Ayham makes dangerous plans… to get his beloved husky, Zeus, out of war-torn Damascus. “

You can see them both in the trailer below. In which Ayham asks Zeus via a video connection to “sing for us”. I’m not crying, you’re crying.

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  3. The savings are huge in selling Amazon’s Ninja one-day kitchen appliances

To see the original version of this article on BGR.com


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Obsession With Ingestion – The Secret Lives Of Dogs Who Just Can’t Say No | Review of northern beaches http://twlabradors.com/obsession-with-ingestion-the-secret-lives-of-dogs-who-just-cant-say-no-review-of-northern-beaches/ http://twlabradors.com/obsession-with-ingestion-the-secret-lives-of-dogs-who-just-cant-say-no-review-of-northern-beaches/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:00:00 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/obsession-with-ingestion-the-secret-lives-of-dogs-who-just-cant-say-no-review-of-northern-beaches/ Intestinal foreign bodies are a common cause of fatal illness in dogs. Worse yet, a number of the dogs I treat for intestinal foreign bodies are serial offenders. An article published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior (Masson et al., 2021) suggests that this may be because pica (ingestion of non-food items like fabrics, plastics, […]]]>

Intestinal foreign bodies are a common cause of fatal illness in dogs.

Worse yet, a number of the dogs I treat for intestinal foreign bodies are serial offenders.

An article published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior (Masson et al., 2021) suggests that this may be because pica (ingestion of non-food items like fabrics, plastics, rubber, stone, metal, or wood) may be a sign of a behavioral disorder underlying.

The researchers noted that pica also occurs in humans and may have links with certain psychiatric conditions, and so they are exploring whether there may be similar issues contributing to behavior in dogs.

The study looked for evidence of potential behavioral causes in dogs requiring foreign body removal.

Intestinal foreign bodies are a problem because they can cause obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, preventing food from passing through.

They cause pain, nausea and vomiting.

They are associated with dangerous loss of body fluids, damage and even perforation of the intestinal wall, especially if they are sharp or linear.

Diagnosis can be difficult.

Treatment usually requires removal of the foreign body, either endoscopically or surgery, and repair of secondary damage to the intestine.

Some dogs require multiple surgeries and an extended hospital stay. In this study, five percent of dogs that had surgery to remove a foreign body by a specialist died, despite all attempts to help them.

That’s a death rate of 1 in 20.

When selecting dogs for the study, the researchers excluded puppies under six months of age, when accidental ingestion of non-food items is common.

They also excluded dogs that had ingested material such as stone fruit pits or hooks, as these can occur when dogs are simply trying to eat what can be covered, and what looks and feels like them. tastes like food.

This does not indicate a behavioral disorder, but it does remind us to be extra careful when disposing of “junk” that can be tempting for a dog to eat.

For me, one of the most interesting findings from this study was the number of foreign bodies found inside the affected dogs.

Most (52%) had eaten between one and five items; 19 percent ate between six and ten items; 24 percent ate between 11 and 50 items and five percent ate more 50 objects.

How can a dog eat more than 50 items?

Usually these items are small.

I have seen dogs swallow small pebbles or hair ties which on their own may not cause drama. But in droves, they are too much for the digestive system.

What we don’t know, and what can be very difficult to say as a vet who surgically retrieves these items, is over what period of time they were eaten.

But chances are, for at least some of these dogs, pica is a habit.

Which brings me back to behavior.

Researchers found evidence of a behavioral disorder in 88 percent of dogs with foreign bodies.

Behavioral disorders included hyperactivity, impulsivity, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and attachment disorders.

Dogs who shredded the objects they eventually ingested were more likely to have hyperactivity-impulsivity disorder.

What Does This Mean For Dogs Who Eat Foreign Objects?

If we don’t take care of the underlying behavioral disorder, it can happen again.

If your dog repeatedly eats non-food items, ask your vet for a referral to a behavioral vet.

When it comes to foreign objects, prevention is better than cure for your dog.

MASSON, S., GUITAUT, N., MEDAM, T. & BÉATA, C. 2021. Link between ingestion of foreign bodies and behavioral disorders in dogs. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 45, 25-32.

Dr Anne Quain BVSc (Hons), MANZCVS (Animal welfare), Dip ECAWBM (AWSEL) is a senior lecturer at the Sydney School of Veterinary Science and a practicing veterinarian.


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Top Show Entries Open For New Zealand Office Dog Competition http://twlabradors.com/top-show-entries-open-for-new-zealand-office-dog-competition/ http://twlabradors.com/top-show-entries-open-for-new-zealand-office-dog-competition/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 22:59:00 +0000 http://twlabradors.com/top-show-entries-open-for-new-zealand-office-dog-competition/ Wednesday, August 25, 2021, 10:59 a.m.Press release: Recruitment of frogs The annual search for the country’s best canine colleague is underway as of Monday. Now in its sixth year, the Frog Recruitment Top Office Dog competition celebrates Kiwi workplaces – including home offices – where mutts are an integral part of the business. In addition […]]]>

The annual search for the country’s best canine colleague is underway as of Monday. Now in its sixth year, the Frog Recruitment Top Office Dog competition celebrates Kiwi workplaces – including home offices – where mutts are an integral part of the business.

In addition to the Top Office Dog, Top Dog with a Job and People’s Choice Awards, 2021 sees a new category included in the competition – Top Dog-Friendly Workplace. The new award will honor a Kiwi organization that puts people first by recognizing the important role a four-legged friend plays in the health and well-being of its employees. The organization can be a single dog show or pack – although we’ve heard that the more dogs at work the better!

“For the new category, we ask companies why they created a dog friendly space at work and what has been the impact on the lives of their employees in any way,” says Shannon Barlow, Managing Director of Frog Recruitment.

“Four-legged support can manifest itself in myriad ways in the workplace and the Top Office Dog competition celebrates dogs that help their employees do their best, as well as their presence improving the mental health of their owner and their staff. colleagues. They are also known to contribute to a positive work culture, ”explains Shannon.

With millions of New Zealand workers currently limited to staying at home under Level 4 lockdown, having a business dog has been shown to improve well-being. Research conducted by Frog Recruitment in April 2020 found that while there was a sharp increase in employee burnout, having a canine colleague at work also had a positive impact, especially on mental health. of the workforce working at home.

“Dogs in the office or home office help their owners and coworkers by providing positive benefits, including improving morale, reducing absenteeism and stress-related illnesses, and helping to improve physical and mental health.” of employees, ”explains Shannon.

Frog created the national wellness competition in 2015, and each year, more than 420,000 people participate via social networks.

The premium trophy, New Zealand’s Top Office Dog, will be awarded to a dog who demonstrates their commitment to improving the working lives of their fellow humans. Category winners each win $ 1,000 in Petstock Prizes, and finalist winners earn $ 250 in Petstock Prizes.

Judging will be performed by sponsors Petstock, Frog Recruitment and Mark Vette, dog trainer and behaviorist. Last year’s Top Dog was Jagger, a rescue dog who “works” at Chained Dog Rehabilitation in Birkdale, Auckland.

“Jagger, a crossbreed mastiff, is a vital member of the staff, who acts as a foster brother to the closed, neglected and abused dogs that arrive at the rescue center. He supports them all and they relax around him. All dogs love him – he’s a dog that teaches other dogs to speak the same language, ”says Shannon.

Registrations for the competition are open from August 30. Visit www.nztopdog.co.nz to fill out the registration form and upload a photo of the best dog in your workplace to Instagram. The public vote for the People’s Choice dog will take place in September, with the winners announced by Frog Recruitment at the world’s largest Zoom meeting featuring dogs on September 28.

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